Barrydale

Barrydale is a unique and special place to be visited all year round.


It is no surprise to learn that Barrydale’s history began when farmers moved into the valley to search for fertile arable land with water. The climate here is nigh on perfect for growing fruit trees, and apples, pears, oranges, apricots, figs, peaches and grape orchards lie scattered across the valley.


Any time of year in this valley is beautiful. Summer is ripe with fruit, autumn heralds in the protea season, and winter is a tapestry of colour as the surrounding Klein Karoo, renowned for its aloes, milkbush, concertina plant and succulents, breaks into flower.


The little village is also easily accessible. One can approach Barrydale from the Garden Route along the Tradouw Pass, from Montagu or from Oudtshoorn across the relentless plateau of the Klein Karoo - each of them beautiful and scenic. The town’s cellars are set in their very own region of origin, the Tradouw valley - the smallest in the country - that produces incredible brandies and wines.


Barrydale's history dates back to the early 18th century when farmers moved into the area looking for fertile arable land with water. The community built their church on a spot where the R62 and R324 roads meet. In the days before the church was built there were a number of nagmaal houses (houses where Holy Communion could be celebrated) and a school, but not much else. The Dutch Reformed Community of Barrydale came into being in 1878 when land was purchased to build the church.

As the farmers in the area were encouraged to plant vineyards and orchards, it was natural that a winery and distillery would eventually be built. In 1940 the Barrydale Koöperatiewe Wynkelder was formed and a distillery established giving rise to the wine industry in the area. Joseph Barry Brandy, produced locally, was voted best brandy in the world in 2003.